When can we go back to Italy?

 

                          Photo credit Pexel.com

 

Ciao friends!

If you are like me, you have been watching news reports like a hawk to get some idea as to when we can all head back to Italy.

We are all hoping that sometime this Summer Italy will open up and be back to some form of normal even if it is with social distancing, masks and other paraphernalia.

Happily someone sent me a link to the Italian Ministry of External Affairs website which gives a pretty complete rundown of the rules as they apply now during phase 2.

In short, you can travel to Italy under some circumstances but the country is not open to tourism yet, at least for those outside the EU.

That said, here are the restrictions as outlined on the website. I copied and pasted them.

  • Which rules apply to persons travelling to Italy from March 28?
  1. Before boarding, the carrier’s staff is required to check the self-certification (to download the form) setting out the following detailed information: the reasons for travelling to Italy (health needs, work requirements, reasons of absolute necessity), the place of self-isolation for 14 days, own or otherwise private means of transportation used to get to the place of self-isolation and a mobile/land phone number. The reasons of “absolute necessity” are as specified in the FAQs previously posted on the website.
  2. All persons entering Italy, whether at an airport, ferry port or railway station, must avoid using public transport and must therefore make arrangements to be picked up, take a taxi, if and as allowed, or hire a car, with or without a driver.For airport transits and for the rules that apply to pickups at the airport, port or station, please consult the specific faq.
  3. All persons entering Italy are required to self-isolate, including persons with their own transport. Persons travelling to Italy for work may postpone the start of the self-isolation period by 72 hours (which can be extended for a further 48 hours), albeit only if strictly necessary.
  4. All persons entering Italy, including persons with their own transport, are required to report to the local health authorities on arrival at their destination.
  5. All persons entering Italy may self-isolate either at home or other place of their choice.
  6. If a person entering Italy has no place for self-isolation, or is unable to travel to their place of self-isolation (if they have no-one to pick them up, if there are no available hotel rooms, etc.), they will be required to self-isolate at a location established by the Civil Protection Service, at the interested person’s expense.
  7. The above rules do not apply to the following persons: cross-border workers, health services personnel, passenger/freight transport crews.

Phase two is still pretty strict but the statements I have seen from Italy’s culture and tourism minister, Dario Franceschini, indicate that he and his team are looking at opening the country up for tourists and are in conversations with other EU countries to see how they can safely make that happen.

While they are only looking at EU countries right now, I am sure other countries will be evaluated soon and we will have the answer to our question, “When can we book?”

Right now, there is no answer to that question but as we get information and sift through the facts versus the fakes, we will know more.

I have also asked our mayor in Santa Domenica Talao to keep me informed and he said he would let me know as soon as he hears something.

It is clear that Italy is picking its way right now after being blindsided by this vicious virus and they want to ensure that they don’t lose any more citizens. Their population tends to be on the older side so they want to take every precaution.

Still, it is our hope that by August we can all go back. We can’t wait. There is so much happening there.

Stay tuned here and I will share whatever information I get.

Meanwhile stay safe and keep making plans!